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Autumn 1996 season

Tuesday 24th September at 8pm
Three Colours: White [Trzy kolory: Bialy]     Poland/France/Switzerland 1993  |  92 mins  |  15
One of the most requested films for this season, the second of Kieslowski’s Three Colours trilogy is the lightest in tone of the three but no less remarkable. Zbigniew Zamachowski plays Karol, a Polish hairdresser living in Paris whose life falls apart when his petulant French wife Dominique divorces him and burns down their hairdressing salon. Having hit rock bottom, Karol returns to Poland and becomes determined to rebuild his life and win back Dominique, whatever it takes. Although played for the most part as black comedy, the background detail is often used to effectively counterpoint this, with an unflattering and pleasingly unsentimental depiction of post-Communist Poland.

Tuesday 1st October at 8pm
Small Faces     UK 1995  |  108 mins  |  18
One of the most acclaimed British films in recent years, Gillies and Billy Mackinnon’s long-cherished study of the lives of three young brothers in 1968 Glasgow and how they are affected by the ever-present threat of gang violence has attracted praise from many quarters and was awarded the Michael Powell award for Best New British Film at the 1995 Edinburgh Film Festival. A powerful and often dynamic work executed with style and laced with humour and the sort of attention to small detail that could only come from experience.

Tuesday 8th October at 8pm     SPECIAL EVENT: Broadstairs Pavilion
The Rocky Horror Picture Show     UK 1975  |  100 mins  |  12
With the Windsor closed for refurbishment for a fortnight, this week we’re taking over the Pavilion (located next to the cinema) to run one of the great cult movies of the modern age. Richard O’Brien’s musical tale of two all-American sweethearts who encounter moral corruption in the shape of transvestites from outer space has become a late-night sensation, with screenings taking on the atmosphere of exuberant parties. This showing will be no exception and the normal rules of polite cinema behaviour will thus be temporarily suspended - the bar will be open throughout and fancy dress and participation will be actively encouraged!

Tuesday 22nd October at 8pm
The Horseman on the Roof [Le hussard sur le toit]     France 1995  |  135 mins  |  15
Another popular request for this season, Rappeneau’s first film since his internationally successful adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac shares many of that film’s qualities in its classic tale of love and old-fashioned swashbuckling adventure. In 19th Century Provence, a young Italian Hussar hiding from Hapsbug agents is by chance teamed with the enignamic Pauline de Théus and agrees to help her search for her missing husband. Reputedly the most expensive French film ever made, Horseman is a constant delight, sumptuously photographed in beautiful French countryside and energetically performed by the entire cast, including a genuinely funny cameo from Gérard Depardieu.

Tuesday 29th October at 8pm
Cyclo     Vietnam/France 1995  |  129 mins  |  18
In modern day Ho Chi Minh City, 18-year-old Kiên supports his family by driving a rented ‘cyclo’ (pedal-cab), and when this is stolen he is forced into a life of crime and violence. Tran Anh Hung’s latest is in many ways a far cry from his first film, The Scent of Green Papaya, and was described by Sight and Sound as “...one of the cinema’s most visceral and deeply-felt decents into hell. It is, in short, an astounding film.” A compelling, unsentimental and uncompromising work that is unwavering in its portrayal of violence, and thus is not an experience for the faint-hearted.

Tuesday 5th November at 8pm
Smoke     US 1995  |  112 mins  |  15
The richness and unpredictability of everyday life are examined by director Wayne Wang and novelist Paul Auster in this hugely enjoyable collection of stories set around a Brooklyn cigar store run by Auggie Wren, played by Harvey Keitel. They range from a novelist (William Hurt) suffering from writer’s block, to a teenage boy facing an uncomfortable reunion with his long-departed father (Forest Whitaker). Rich in character detail, intricately structured and boasting some fine performances, the film is a virtual celebration of the more intimate side New York life and a testament to the pleasures of storytelling. (Cine Outsider review)

Tuesday 12th November at 8pm
Merci la vie     France 1991  |  119 mins  |  18
Two girls thrown together by chance go in search of excitement and enlightenment, through sexual encounters, acting in a film and an investigation of the past, both personal and national. Presented initially as straight drama, the story soon moves into increasingly surrealistic territory as the girls find their reality fragmenting, with jumps through time to witness the Nazi occupation of France and its resistance, or so that one of them may ensure her future existence by encouraging her father to make love to her mother. Blier’s playful, broken-mirror structure makes for fascinating viewing, propelled along by energetic performances, a fine soundtrack and the sheer inventiveness of its director.

Tuesday 19th November at 8pm
We Don't Want to Talk About It [De eso no se habla]     Argentina / Italy 1993  |  105 mins  |  PG
One of the most requested films for this season, the second of Kieslowski’s Three Colours trilogy is the lightest in tone of the three but no less remarkable. Zbigniew Zamachowski plays Karol, a Polish hairdresser living in Paris whose life falls apart when his petulant French wife Dominique divorces him and burns down their hairdressing salon. Having hit rock bottom, Karol returns to Poland and becomes determined to rebuild his life and win back Dominique, whatever it takes. Although played for the most part as black comedy, the background detail is often used to effectively counterpoint this, with an unflattering and pleasingly unsentimental depiction of post-Communist Poland.

Tuesday 26th November at 8pm
[Safe]     USA 1995  |  118 mins  |  15
Carol, a normal, middle-class American housewife, has her world of domestic oblivion thrown off its axis when she develops a mystery illness that puts her at odds with every aspect of the world around her. Todd Haynes, who previously won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival for Poison, uses the story to examine the effects of a real condition - environmental illness - and its obvious parallels to AIDS, as well as what Haynes sees as “the disintegration of the American 20th Century.” Stylish visuals, a haunting music score and a powerful central performance from Julianne Moore all contribute to a disturbing and uniquely unsettling whole.

Tuesday 3rd December at 8pm
Days of Being Wild [A Fei jingjyuhn]     Hong Kong 1991  |  93 mins  |  12
Set in the Hong Kong of 1960, the most remarkable film to date from Hong Kong’s brightest new directoral star is a dazzling study of seemingly directionless individuals - lazy, womanising playboy Yuddy, his Shanghainese foster mother Rebecca, his friend Zeb, and the women Yuddy casually romances until the first mention of commitment - and how their life choices affect both themselves and those close to them. Wai recently hit the international big time with Ashes of Time and Chungking Express, but this still stands as his finest achievement, and was described by Sight & Sound as “...a tour de force of non-linear narrative, atmospherics, poetic rhythms and (thanks to sensational camerawork and design) visual writing.”

Tuesday 10th December at 8pm
Farinelli il castrato     Italy / Belgium 1994  |  111 mins  |  15
Sumptuous biography of the 18th Century’s most celebrated castrato singer, a treat for fans of costume drama and opera alike, but inventive enough in structure and execution to find favour with a much wider audience. The film examines both Farinelli’s stage career and his relationships with those around him, notably his composer brother and the many women who are seduced by his extraordinary voice, which was authentically reproduced for the film using digital sound technology.